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Stories to Make You Think Big

September 26, 2014 in Press

Science Friday

Author

Nina Miller has been a designer at Arizona State University since 2005. Nina has taught foundation level courses in the ASU Visual Communications program and she has been an actor and performer in Phoenix since 1995. Her research in Interaction Design focuses on theatrical improvisation and how it might inspire the collaborative design process. Nina is a board member, instructor and improvisor at The Torch Theatre, a non-profit improv collective in central Phoenix.

Project Hieroglyph and Imagining Possible Futures on Public Radio

April 24, 2014 in Hieroglyph

Ed Finn, director of ASU’s Center for Science and the Imagination and co-editor of Project Hieroglyph, was featured earlier this month on the public radio program To the Best of Our Knowledge, in an episode titled “Imagining Possible Worlds,” about science fiction and visions of the future.To the Best of Our Knowledge

“Let’s use the nightmares and the dreams together to come up with a roadmap to the world that we really want to live in,” said Finn, responding to a question about Project Hieroglyph’s “thoughtfully optimistic” approach to the future that seeks a middle ground between sunny utopias and gloomy, apocalyptic dystopias.

According to Finn, one major goal of Project Hieroglyph is to create “new icons … big ideas that could drive lots of different people to work on a problem collectively.”

To the Best of Our Knowledge is produced by Wisconsin Public Radio and distributed to hundreds of public radio stations nationwide by Public Radio International. Other guests on the “Imagining Possible Worlds” program included authors Kim Stanley Robinson, Junot Díaz and Samuel R. Delany, as well as Gates McFadden, a cast member on “Star Trek: The Next Generation.”

To listen to the full program or download it for free, visit To the Best of Our Knowledge. You can also download an extended interview with Finn to hear more about the Center for Science and the Imagination, Project Hieroglyph and thoughtfully optimistic visions of the future.

Author

Joey Eschrich is the editor and program manager at the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University. He earned his bachelor’s degree in Film and Media Studies in 2008 and his master’s degree in Gender Studies in 2011, both from ASU.