Welcome to Hieroglyph

March 25, 2013 in Announcements, Hieroglyph

Greetings and welcome to the new Hieroglyph website! We’ve spent a lot of time building a new platform for this project that we hope will be responsive, elegant and easy to use. The site has both public and private areas so contributors can work in small groups or share their thoughts with the public, as they choose. Here are a few ways to learn more:

  • See who’s involved with Hieroglyph using our growing roster of Featured Contributors
  • You can explore specific collaborations using the Projects tab. We’re starting with two: the Tall Tower and Remote Stereolunagraphy.
  • The forums are a public space for writers, engineers, scientists and the general public to share ideas.

Feel free to get in touch with us, dive into an ongoing conversation or start a new one. Welcome aboard!

Ed Finn & Kathryn Cramer, Co-Editors

Returning Users

To log in with your existing username and/or email address, please follow this link to reset your password for the new site.

If you were active on the previous version of the Hieroglyph site, we are happy to let you know that we are transferring over all your content, including your user account (but it might take us a little while). You’ll notice that all usernames and contributions are preserved in the forums that we have moved over already. So if you contributed content before, it will still be associated with your username and email address.

New Users

If you are new to Hieroglyph, welcome! For the next few weeks Hieroglyph will remain invitation-only. If you would like to request access before we open up the site to public registration, please use the “Request an Invitation” button on the homepage.

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Author
Ed Finn is the founding director of the Center for Science and the Imagination at Arizona State University, where he is an assistant professor with a joint appointment in the School of Arts, Media, and Engineering and the Department of English. He has worked as a journalist at Time, Slate, and Popular Science. He lives in Phoenix, Arizona.

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